Tuesday, January 18, 2011

No sex, please, we're Japanese

Talking 'soshoku danshi' (herbivore/grass-eating boys), young men who can do without sex --and just about anything else one might find stimulating or competitive -- thankyouverymuch, with my dear friend Madeleine Brand on "The Madeleine Brand Show" here.

2 comments:

ArthurFrDent said...

Great talk... It was certainly interesting how you kept steering the conversation away from the physicality and towards the underlying meaning of the grass eater rebellion. I think that was important, because to me that's the point... this is so much more than just an ambivalent reaction to girls, or they to boys. There is something going on there, behind their eyes.

although, it's amusing that we are focussing on how some percentage of men are grass-eaters... when it sounds like a MUCH HIGHER percentage of women are checking out of being a part of a family. Why aren't people as uptight about that? The dearth of children ISN'T primarily caused by men being disinterested, rather it's the woman's choice/disinterest.

so what's the word for the career woman who never wants a family? Is anyone looking at the underlying thought process there?

also? kinda funny that the intro music chosen was a great tune called Cannonball by a band, The Breeders, from the early 90's [The Deal sisters, also of the Pixies]
:shrug: I'm easily amused, I guess.

Roland Kelts said...

Thanks. I can't think of an exact female analog for 'soshoku danshi,' but there is the popular term for middle-aged women, 'arafo,' which is an abbreviation of 'around 40' and is usually used for single professional women who are independent-minded and independent of men:
http://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/arafo-gu-voted-most-popular-words-for-2008

And you're right, of course: They are the primary reason for the kid-deficit--and are largely the result of a sclerotic patriarchal corporate structure that denies them opportunity once they get married and/or bear children.

Ah, 'The Breeders.' Thanks for pointing that out.